SUPPORT FOR KINDER MORGAN’S PROMOTIONAL TOUR FROM THE MOST UNLIKELY PACES

For Immediate Release – December 5, 2012

SUPPORT FOR KINDER MORGAN’S PROMOTIONAL TOUR
FROM THE MOST UNLIKELY PACES

BURNABY, BC — BROKE objects to the Port of Vancouver, a Crown corporation, participating in Kinder Morgan’s promotional tour of the Lower Mainland. Kinder Morgan, a US based oil pipeline giant, is conducting a promotion tour in Alberta and British Columbia to sell a controversial plan to expand its shipments of diluted tar sands to Burarrd Inlet where it will be transported by tankers to China and other offshore locations.

Shipments of diluted tar sands would increase to 750,000 barrel a day. To ship tar sands by pipeline requires mixing it with a range of toxic chemicals, heating it and putting it under high pressure so that it becomes more fluid. Kinder Morgan cannot guarantee that leaks and spills of oil from pipelines, sub-stations and and oil tank will not happen and have reported almost one accident per year over the past 10 years with evacuations in Burnaby in 2007 and again in 2009 and also in Sumas in 2012. Transport Canada found in an investigation of the Sumas spill that Kinder Morgan did not adequately respond to the spill and that compounded the problem.

The Port of Vancouver contributed to Kinder Morgan’s promotional tour of the controversial oil pipeline and oil tank farm expansion on October 24, 2012 at Stoney Creek Community School in Burnaby. Personnel with the Port reportedly answered questions about the plan to build a new crude oil pipeline and denied the need to dredge Second Narrows to make way for super sized oil tankers. A Port of Vancouver spokesperson is reported to have assured concerned visitors that no dredging would occur and that there was no greater danger of oil tankers passing through the narrows despite the need for more frequent shipments.

According to Elsie Dean of BROKE, “The Port of Vancouver’s participation in Kinder Morgan’s public relations work to sell their plan to build a new bigger pipeline to ship diluted bitumen gives the appearance of a serious conflict of interest. The Port of Vancouver is a Crown Corporation and is supposed to be an independent body. The Port should not be participating in Kinder Morgan’s, or any other, private promotional event. The participation of the Port gives, at the very least, the appearance of a serious conflict of interest. We demand the Port cease promoting Kinder Morgan’s planned expansion. It is incumbent on the Port Authority to maintain an independent position as a Crown corporation.”

Karl Perrin, also of BROKE, said that: “If the participation of the Port of Vancouver in Kinder Morgan’s promotional tour is not a direct conflict of interest, then it represents at the very least an apparent conflict of interest. The Port should cease all participation as it clearly undermines trust in a public institutions.”
Karl noted, “The Port of Vancouver, which oversees and regulates Kinder Morgan activities, should not be using its resources to promote, or be seen to support, Kinder Morgan’s pipeline proposal or any private interest.”

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For more information, please contact:

Elsie Dean – (604) 294-5834 E-mail: ewdean@telus.net

Karl Perrin – (604) E-mail: perrink@shaw.ca

Burnaby Resident Opposing KinderMorgan’s Expansion
www.brokepipelinewatch.ca
E-mail: info.brokepipelinewatch.ca
Twitter @NoPipelines

Trans Mountain Pipeline operators ignored alarms warning of Abbotsford oil spill: report

By Gordon Hamilton, Vancouver Sun

Kinder Morgan’s Sumas terminal or tank farm sits across from the intersection of McKee Road and Sumas Mountain Road in Abbotsford. Residents who smell vapours report to the emergency number.
Kinder Morgan’s Sumas terminal or tank farm sits across from the intersection of McKee Road and Sumas Mountain Road in Abbotsford. Residents who smell vapours report to the emergency number.

A National Energy Board report reveals that Trans Mountain Pipeline operators ignored warning alarms for three-and-a-half hours before responding to a gasket failure that resulted in a crude oil spill last January at its Sumas tank farm near Abbotsford.

It took six hours after the first warning sounded for Trans Mountain’s Sumas operator to arrive on the scene, where a spill was discovered. The crude oil did not escape from a containment area but noxious fumes were released into the atmosphere, affecting nearby residents.

The NEB estimates 90,000 litres of crude oil escaped.

This latest oil spill report comes at a time when pipeline owner Kinder Morgan is applying to expand the pipeline’s capacity from 300,000 barrels a year to 750,000 barrels to feed Asian markets. It has given the company a black eye, said Ben West, of the Wilderness Committee.

The report is critical of monitoring staff at Trans Mountain’s control centre at Edmonton, stating that the control centre operator failed to set an alarm within the required time limit of 15 minutes after an oil transfer had taken place at the Sumas tank farm the evening of Jan. 23, and then failed to respond to leak warning alarms that sounded every hour until the operator’s shift ended.

The NEB report finds that the leak was detected later than it should have been, the control centre operator did not follow procedures and there were improper alarm settings in a recently-installed data acquisition system. The board states Trans Mountain Pipeline has identified corrective actions to address the report’s findings.

“The board finds that these actions are appropriate to prevent the occurrence of similar incidents in the future.”

The report, which was released earlier this month, states that the operator assumed the alarms were being caused by high winds and did not send a field technician to investigate.

Further, the operator failed to understand that the volume in the tank was dropping.

“The night shift CCO (control centre operator) did notice the trend, but considering the initial volume change as relatively small, interpreted the cause as a weather event, not a possible leak,” states the report.

The spill happened at an undetermined time around midnight Jan. 23 as a result of a gasket failure on the roof of a tank caused by pressure from frozen water in the roof drain system.

The temperature was cold and a strong wind was blowing. There had been a transfer of warmer crude oil into the tank earlier in the evening; after the transfer, the control centre operator failed to set the warning alarm.

There were two alarm systems, a new system and a legacy system. The new alarm was set at 11:26 p.m., Jan. 23 but the one that the operator was to use for monitoring, the legacy system, was not set until 1:11 a.m., Jan. 24.

At 2:39 a.m., Jan. 24 the first alarm from the legacy system was received. The command centre operator decided it was a false alarm.

At 3:11 a second alarm was received, from the new system being installed on the pipeline, but the operator again assumed it was a false alarm.

At 4:11, a third alarm was received. The centre operator deemed it notable but did not see any change in the tank level so left a note on it for the day shift.

A new shift arrived at 5 a.m. The day operator reviewed tank levels but determined the one-cubic-metre change was within the accuracy level of the measuring device.

At 5:47 the fourth alarm was received and at 5:50, the operator called the Sumas terminal operator to investigate. The terminal operator arrived on the site at 6:50, discovered the leak and closed the roof drain, isolating the source.

The control centre received the first odour complaint at 7 a.m.

The fact that, similar to Enbridge’s 2010 spill on the Kalamazoo River in Michigan, Trans Mountain Pipeline staff ignored warning alarms raises concerns over Trans Mountain’s plans to twin its Edmonton-to-Burnaby pipeline, said Jay Ritchlin, director-general of the David Suzuki Foundation.

“Even with highly advanced systems you will have a spill. This case seems to be a really egregious case of human error. It’s tragic. What you have is the release of a chemical that does significant harm to human health and the environment during the peak period when you could actually hope to do something about it,” he said. “I think people are seeing more and more instances of spills … and are seeing difficulty in getting any realistic response. I think it will make people more suspicious that these kinds of things can be run safely.”

After the spill, Kinder Morgan spokesperson Lexa Hobenshield said the only threat to residents was from nuisance odours.

In an email Tuesday, she said: “We take all incidents at our facilities seriously. Kinder Morgan Canada completed a thorough investigation and learned lessons after oil from a storage tank was released into a fully contained area on KMC’s Sumas Terminal property on January 24, 2012.

“As a result of our investigation, we have established new prevention and community notification measures, which we have communicated to the Sumas Mountain community, and will continue to provide updates as needed.” (What are these?)

Abbotsford resident and pipeline opponent Michael Hale, who discovered the NEB report, said it reinforces his concerns.

“There seems to be a propensity on the company’s part to minimize the seriousness of what was involved,” he said.

ghamilton@vancouversun.com

© Copyright (c) The Vancouver Sun

Kinder Morgan ignored warnings in Sumas Mountain oil spill: report

As Kinder Morgan visits Fraser Valley communities holding open houses on its Trans Mountain oil pipeline twinning project, the National Energy Board (NEB) has issued a critical report into the company’s oil spill in Abbotsford earlier this year.

On Jan. 24, 110,000 litres of oil leaked from a holding tank at Kinder Morgan’s Sumas Mountain terminal site. The cause was pressure on a gasket caused by freezing water, according to the NEB.

The report issued earlier this month to interested parties and posted on the NEB site on Nov. 22 found “the leak was detected later than it should have been,” the company’s management of procedures was “inadequate” and that the operator “failed to recognize the leak situation” on two occasions.

Critics of the company and its Trans Mountain pipeline say the report reveals deficiencies in Kinder Morgan’s response to leaks.

“When I ask the company about the risk of spills they point to the spill at the tank farm in Abbotsford in January this year, which they claim was ‘quickly contained,'” Michael Hale, Chilliwack resident and member of the PIPE UP network said. “Over 110,000 litres of a noxious petroleum product were spilled. The more information I get, including this report from the National Energy Board, suggests that the containment was not that simple or quick.”

In material handed out at the Chilliwack open house on Tuesday, the company says: “Trans Mountain pump stations and terminals have monitoring and spill containment systems that are rigorously maintained and meet NEB standards.”

The comparison has been made to the huge oil spill into the Kalamazoo River in Michigan in 2010 that was not noticed by Enbridge’s monitoring system in Edmonton for 17 hours.

In the Abbotsford spill, the NEB report said that at 2:39 a.m. on Jan. 24, a “creep” alarm was received at Trans Mountain’s Edmonton control centre but it was determined to be a false alarm due to high winds.

A second alarm at 3:11 a.m. was also dismissed as false.

It took two more alarms and a shift change before a terminal operator was sent out at 5:50 a.m. to attend the Sumas site and investigate the cause of the alarm.

At 6:50 a.m.-four hours after the first alarm-the operator arrived on site, discovered the leak, closed the valve and isolated the source.

There were no injuries or environmental damage as the leak was contained to the site although noxious fumes were released that affected neighbours.

The NEB was notified of the leak at 8:16 a.m. after the Transportation Safety Board and before the nearby Auguston Traditional School, the Abbotsford Police, FVRD, Fraser Health and MLAs John van Dongen and Randy Hawes, among other agencies.

Since 1961, there have been 78 reported spills on the Trans Mountain pipeline some of which were below the reportable threshold of 1.5 cubic barrels.

More than 70 per cent of all spills have occurred at pump stations or terminals, according to Kinder Morgan.

The company is currently amid public consultation meetings on a $4.3-billion twinning of its 1,150-kilometre pipeline. This would more than double the capacity from 300,000 barrels per day (bpd) to 750,000 bpd.

For its part, Kinder Morgan representatives say they have learned from recommendations made after every spill.

Critics are quick to point to incidents such as the one in Abbotsford as a cause for concern.

“Including the spill 2012, there have been a total of four major spills since Kinder Morgan bought this line in 2005,” said Chilliwack resident and PIPE UP member Sheila Muxlow. “One in Abbotsford in 2005 spilled 210,000 litres into Kilgard Creek. A spill of 250,000 litres in Burnaby in 2007 caused people to be evacuated from their homes, a cleanup that took over a year and fines levied on Kinder Morgan. Another spill in Burnaby in 2009 resulted in 200,000 litres being spilled at the tank farm there.”

The Nov. 22 report concluded: “The NEB expects companies to demonstrate a commitment to continual improvement in safety, security, and environmental protection, and in promoting a positive safety culture and strong management systems. The Board is satisfied that TMPU’s corrective actions are appropriate to prevent the occurrence of similar incidents in the future.”

phenderson@chilliwacktimes.com

Read more stories from the ChilliwackTimes.com.
© Copyright (c) Chilliwack Times

Original source article: Kinder Morgan ignored warnings in Sumas Mountain oil spill: report

Read more: http://www.chilliwacktimes.com/business/Hoping+study+answers+grad+rate+question/7626511/story.html#ixzz2EEqTA3lv

Kinder Morgan to Pay $7.5 Million In Wrongful Death Case

A Clark County Nevada District Court jury has awarded the family of Nevada truck driver, Rick Lewis, $7.5 million in a case where the Lewis family accused Kinder Morgan Energy Partners L.P. of failing to monitor its operations for benzene exposure during routine operations, disregarding normal safety and industrial hygiene practices, and failing to warn its employees and contractors about the hazards associated with benzene exposure.

The lawsuit said that Lewis was exposed to benzene while working as a gasoline tanker-truck driver at a Kinder Morgan bulk loading facility, where he loaded gas on a daily bases and delivered it to various retail outlets. This exposure lead Lewis to develop Myelodysplastic Syndrome, a disease of the bone marrow which causes the abnormal production of blood cells and platelets. It is generally incurable and requires chemotherapy, transfusions, and bone marrow transplants. Benzene is a known carcinogen which can cause various forms blood and bone marrow diseases and leukemia. Mr. Lewis was diagnosed with MDS in March 2008 and died in May 2009 at the age of 58.

The lead attorney for the Lewis family said “The jury’s verdict confirms that Kinder Morgan acted in a negligent manner in distributing benzene-containing gasoline without ever warning of the dangers associated with benzene exposure. The verdict underscores that corporations have a duty to workers to protect them from hazards associated with their facilities and products. Although we cannot bring Mr. Lewis back, we hope that this verdict will send a message that these inactions will not be tolerated.”

breakinglawsuitnews.com disclaimer: This article: Kinder Morgan to Pay $7.5 Million In Wrongful Death Case was posted on Wednesday, October 19th, 2011 at 7:02 pm at breakinglawsuitnews.com and is filed under Toxic Substances Lawsuits.

Kinder Morgan announces ‘info session’ in Chilliwack

Author
By Robert Freeman
Kinder Morgan is scheduled to hold an information session in Chilliwack later this month on the proposed pipeline expansion project.

A spokesperson for the company did not return a call for more details, but according to the Trans Mountain website, the Chilliwack session will be held Nov. 27 at the Best Western Rainbow Country Inn. The event is scheduled to start at 5 p.m., according to the website.

Meanwhile, earlier information sessions held in communities east of Chilliwack are drawing criticism from opponents of the plan to expand the pipeline that runs from the Alberta oil sands, through the Fraser Valley, and on to ocean ports in Vancouver.

Critics said the information sessions are not true community consultation, but a company spokesperson said the format allows individuals to ask representatives at the sessions questions they might feel too intimidated to ask in front of a crowd of opponents to the project.

PIPE UP Network spokesman Mike Hale said the group is “not optimistic” the information session in Chilliwack will shed much light on “the realities of tar sands exports.”

“Kinder Morgan seems to be on a ‘transmit’ rather than ‘receive’ in their communications these days,” he said, about the info session format, adding “this is not to be confused with consultation.”

PIPE UP members will attend the Chilliwack session to provide a different point of view on the expansion proposal.

rfreeman@theprogress.com

twitter.com/paperboy2

Kinder Morgan “Information” Sessions and Events

Kinder Morgan “Information” Sessions and Events Hosted or Recommended by BROKE

Date Event
13 November 2012 East Vancouver Info Session – Pacific National Exhibition (PNE), Hastings Room (2901 East Hastings Street) – 5pm-8pm
15 November 2012 Downtown Vancouver Info Session – Harbour Centre, Segal Hall (515 West Hastings Street) – 5pm-8pm
17 November 2012 West Point Grey Info Session – Aberthau Mansion (4397 West 2nd Ave) – 5pm-8pm
20 November 2012 Coquitlam Info Session – Centennial Secondary School, Courtyard (570 Poirier Street) – 5pm-8pm. Contact Sven Biggs at sven@tankerfreebc.org
21 November 2012 Surrey Info Session – Ellendale Elementary School (14525 110A Avenue) – 5pm-8pm
November 24  2012 Burnaby Info Session #1 – Stoney Creek Community School (2740 Beaverbrook Crescent) – drop in from 1pm-4pm. Contact Karl Perrin at perrink@shaw.ca
November 26  2012 Burnaby Info. Session #2 -Eagle Creek at Burnaby Mountain Golf Course, 7600 Halifax, 6:30-8. Contact Mary Hatch at maryhatch@shaw.ca

Tsleil-Waututh Nation Advisory

The Tsleil-Waututh Nation is encouraging the public to attend information sessions on the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in hopes that most of those who attend will be critics of the project.

But Tsleil-Waututh members say they will keep their distance while the information sessions are under way. The Tsleil-Waututh has decided to keep its distance because it expects to be consulted by the federal government on the $4.1-billion project.

It deems itself a sovereign government with constitutionally protected rights and title. Participating with Kinder Morgan in anything that would be deemed as consultation with respect to the pipeline would be counter to that position, it says.

“We, as a nation, expect to have a meaningful consultation – government to government,” said Carleen Thomas, an elected council member of the Tsleil-Waututh.

“We are clear that the government cannot delegate this obligation to consult to third parties such as Kinder Morgan.”

Burnaby Residents Opposed to KinderMorgan Expansion Advisory

BROKE urges the public  to not Sign in at Kinder Morgan “information” sessions and to not fill out the Kinder Morgan consultation forms. These sessions are not public consultations or part of the government process.

After attending an info session Len Laycock said he found the public hearing to be more like a “sales centre for condos.” Except in this case they are trying to sell you a toxic pipeline.

Other Events Hosted or Recommended by BROKE

Date Event
21 November 2012 7:00 PM Chevron Advisory Committee Open House – Confederation Seniors Centre. The meeting is open to the public. We encourage people to to go and ask questions.
29 November 7-8:45pm “White Water Black Gold” Location TBA. See updates at http://brokepipelinewatch.ca/events. Contact person Ruth at ruth@cranberrycommons.ca
10 December, 2012 6:15 PM Kay Meek Theatre, West Vancouver, Ben West and Ruben George to speak

Kinder Morgan Schedule of Public Info Sessions

Kinder Morgan “Information” Sessions Locations and Dates

Date Event
13 November 2012 East Vancouver Info Session – Pacific National Exhibition (PNE), Hastings Room (2901 East Hastings Street) – 5pm-8pm
15 November 2012 Downtown Vancouver Info Session – Harbour Centre, Segal Hall (515 West Hastings Street) – 5pm-8pm
17 November 2012 West Point Grey Info Session – Aberthau Mansion (4397 West 2nd Ave) – 5pm-8pm
20 November 2012 Coquitlam Info Session – Centennial Secondary School, Courtyard (570 Poirier Street) – 5pm-8pm
21 November 2012 Surrey Info Session – Ellendale Elementary School (14525 110A Avenue) – 5pm-8pm
November 24 2012 Burnaby Info Session #1 – Stoney Creek Community School (2740 Beaverbrook Crescent) – drop in from 1pm-4pm

Tsleil-Waututh Nation Media Advisory

The Tsleil-Waututh Nation is encouraging the public to attend information sessions on the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in hopes that most of those who attend will be critics of the project.

But Tsleil-Waututh members say they will keep their distance while the information sessions are under way. The Tsleil-Waututh has decided to keep its distance because it expects to be consulted by the federal government on the $4.1-billion project.

It deems itself a sovereign government with constitutionally protected rights and title. Participating with Kinder Morgan in anything that would be deemed as consultation with respect to the pipeline would be counter to that position, it says.

“We, as a nation, expect to have a meaningful consultation – government to government,” said Carleen Thomas, an elected council member of the Tsleil-Waututh.

“We are clear that the government cannot delegate this obligation to consult to third parties such as Kinder Morgan.”

Burnaby Residents Opposed to KinderMorgan Expansion

BROKE urges the public to not Sign in at Kinder Morgan “information” sessions and to not fill out the Kinder Morgan consultation forms. These sessions are not public consultations or part of the government process.

After attending an info session Len Laycock said he found the public hearing to be more like a “sales centre for condos.” Except in this case they are trying to sell you a toxic pipeline.

Kinder Morgan public information sessions

As many of us know, Kinder Morgan has now begun holding “public information sessions” in a number of BC communities along the Trans Mountain pipeline route. Not surprisingly, the recent session held in North Vancouver was severely lacking in the information department—the company is not even offering detailed community-level maps of the route through local neighbourhoods.

Instead of providing meaningful dialogue about their controversial pipeline proposal, these sessions are being used by the company as a sort of “focus group” to gauge support and opposition. It’s a way to help formulate a better strategy to sell the idea to the public when the company eventually applies to the National Energy Board (NEB) at the end of next year.

People need to understand that these sessions are not part of a government assessment process. Kinder Morgan has yet to provide details of their plan to the NEB, and when they do, there will be a federal review (and potentially a provincial one as well, depending on the outcome of next year’s election).

That said, we still need to keep the pressure on Kinder Morgan and use every opportunity we can to let this company know how strongly we feel that this project should not go ahead!! There are several “info sessions” coming up in other BC communities. JOIN IN and help share the other side to Kinder Morgan’s story, and to counter their false claims about pipeline safety, jobs and community engagement.

Here are the details about the upcoming sessions in the Lower Mainland, many dates and locations have yet to be determined:

13 November 2012 East Vancouver Info Session – Pacific National Exhibition (PNE), Hastings Room (2901 East Hastings Street) – drop in from 5pm-8pm

15 November 2012 Downtown Vancouver Info Session – Harbour Centre, Segal Hall (515 West Hastings Street) – drop in from 5pm-8pm

17 November 2012 West Point Grey Info Session – Aberthau Mansion (4397 West 2nd Ave) – drop in from 5pm-8pm

17 November 2012 Abbotsford Info Session – Sandman Hotel (32720 Simon Avenue) – drop in from 1pm-4pm

20 November 2012 Coquitlam Info Session – Centennial Secondary School, Courtyard (570 Poirier Street) – drop in from 5pm-8pm

21 November 2012 Surrey Info Session – Ellendale Elementary School (14525 110A Avenue) – drop in from 5pm-8pm

22 November 2012 Langley Info Session – Walnut Grove Secondary School (8919 Walnut Grove Drive) – drop in from 5pm-8pm

November 26 – December 02 2012 Chilliwack Info Session – Location, Date & Time TBC

November 26 – December 02 2012 Hope Info Session – Location, Date & Time TBC

November 26 – December 02 2012 Abbotsford Info Session – Location, Date & Time TBC

IT would be great if some PIPE UP folks would be interested to hang outside these events, supplementing the company’s information with maps and resources of our own, including the BLUE DROP symbol and potentially a table for ‘Disillusionment Counseling’ after people go through their sessions or a photo booth where we can take a photo of folks with a message for Kinder Morgan and help share it on Social Media. PLEASE COME OUT AND JOIN US to ask the tough questions and add your voice to the growing opposition to this project!

**Just remember, if you do attend, don’t “sign in” or fill out one of the company’s consultation forms. These could be counted by Kinder Morgan as part of the “consultation” requirement for their formal application to the government—and we don’t want to add false legitimacy to this process.**

Let’s remind Kinder Morgan that our communities and coastlines are not for sale!

For the full list of info sessions and locations please visit: http://www.tankerfreebc.org/kinder_morgan_open_houses