WHAT’S FUELLING OUR ECONOMY: Is Kinder Morgan’s Proposed Pipeline Inconsistent with New Economic Trends and Realities?

Report Compiled by Liz McDowell, Tarah Stafford and Felicity Lawong

Conversations for Responsible Economic Development (CRED)

November 2016

Executive Summary

British Columbia is leading economic growth in Canada, largely due to a diverse and thriving economy. Extractive industries, including oil and gas, play a surprisingly small role. The biggest sectors are real estate, construction and wholesale and retail trade.

Despite regional variation, Canada’s economy has some clear parallels to BC. Wholesale and retail trade and construction are thriving nationally, and the majority of the country’s jobs are found in wholesale and retail trade and the health sector, like in BC. Even before the price of oil began its steep decline in 2014, this sector was responsible for just 1% of employment across Canada, and provided very low tax contributions. It is the finance and insurance industries, as well as the manufacturing sector, that contribute the largest tax revenues toward social services.

The federal government has been faced with a difficult decision on whether or not to invest in the Kinder Morgan pipeline. Our analysis shows that the pipeline would create few jobs, minimal tax revenues and would not impact energy security or guarantee a long-term solution to Alberta’s ailing economy. The pipeline also comes with the additional concerns (and costs) of an oil spill. Beyond the direct clean-up costs, the indirect economic impacts would be long lasting, impacting sectors from tourism to agriculture.

It’s crucial that the federal government reject the KM pipeline and instead support sectors in BC that create family- sustaining jobs, make significant tax contributions, insulate the regional economy from boom-and-bust cycles, and promote economic growth compatible with Canada’s national climate commitments.

Our key findings:

  • BC Jobs: Technology, tourism, construction, film and television each create more jobs than oil, gas, and mining combined.
  • National trends are similar to BC: Oil and gas have a bigger role in Canada as a whole than in BC, but real estate, finance and manufacturing contribute more in federal corporate tax.
  • More people across Canada work in the beer economy than in the oil sands.
  • The proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline would only create 50 permanent jobs and generate an insignificantamount of taxes federally and provincially in BC.
  • A large oil spill could have a $1.2 billion impact on BC’s economy.
  • Canada’s emissions growth between 1990 and 2014 was driven primarily by increased emissions from mining and upstream oil and gas production and transport. Now that Canada has committed to a national climate plan, emissions from extractive sectors must be taken into consideration when considering project approvals.
  • Labour market outlook: Neither activity nor employment in Canada’s oil and gas industry will recover to levels prior to 2014’s steep decline in the industry.

Read more: http://credbc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Whats-Fuelling-Our-Economy_KM_WEB.pdf

Prime minister facing moment of truth on Indigenous rights

By John Dillon

Ecological Economy Program Coordinator

KAIROS Policy Briefing Papers are written to help inform public debate on key domestic and foreign policy issues

As the newly elected Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau handed mandate letters to all cabinet ministers that stated: “No relationship is more important to me and to Canada than the one with Indigenous Peoples. It is time for a renewed, nation-to-nation relationship with Indigenous Peoples, based on recognition of rights, respect, co-operation, and partnership.” His letter to Dr. Carolyn Bennett, the Minister of Indige- nous and Northern Affairs, also included as a first pri- ority “to implement recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, starting with the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.”

From the beginning of the new government’s man- date there was always the potential for conflict be- tween these commitments to Indigenous rights and the Liberal Party platform promising “Our plan will de- liver the economic growth and jobs Canadians need, and leave to our children and grandchildren a country even more … sustainable … than the one we have now.”1

The day is fast approaching when Prime Minister Trudeau and his government will have to choose be- tween their promises to respect Indigenous rights and their preference for large resource projects and fossil fuel export pipelines to grow the economy.

Read more:

briefing-paper-47-moment-of-truth

TAR SANDS: The Myth of Tidewater Access

Summary
The idea that greater pipeline capacity and access to tidewater would maximize the value Alberta receives for its tar sands crude is a standard talking point for industry, politicians, and other commentators in the ongoing oil price-induced recession in Alberta. With the province bearing significant consequences of the collapse of global oil prices, attention is rightfully focused on what can and should be done to support Alberta through, and out of, its economic rut.

Read more…

National Energy Board Report Trans Mountain Expansion Project May 2016

Canadian public interest The National Energy Board (NEB or Board) finds that the Trans Mountain Expansion Project (Project) is in Canada’s public interest, and recommends the Governor in Council (GIC) approve the Project and direct the Board to issue the necessary Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN) and amended CPCNs. Should the GIC approve the Project, the associated regulatory instruments (Instruments) issued by the Board would come into effect.

 

Read more…

Bill C-51 A Legal Primer: Overly broad and unnecessary anti-terrorism reforms could criminalize free speech

C. Ruby , N. R. Hasan
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
February 17, 2015
Bill C-51: A Legal Primer

by Clayton Ruby and Nader R. Hasan

Six Muslim young adults stand in front of a mosque late at night in heated discussion in some foreign language. They may be debating the merits of a new Drake album. They may be talking about video games, or sports, or girls, or advocating the overthrow of the Harper government. Who knows? There is no evidence one way or the other. Just stereotypes. But the new standard for arrest and detention – reason to suspect that they may commit an act – is so low that an officer may be inclined to arrest and detain them in order to investigate further. And now, officers will no longer need to ask themselves whether the arrest is necessary. They could act on mere suspicion that an arrest is likely to prevent any terrorist activity. Yesterday, the Muslim men were freely exercising constitutional rights to freedom of expression and assembly. Today they are arrestable.

Read more…

SLAPP Suit Resources (Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation)

In November 2014, hundreds protested daily for weeks on Burnaby Mountain against the Kinder Morgan (KM) pipeline expansion, and over 100 were arrested. KM launched lawsuits against five individuals and Burnaby Residents Opposing Kinder Morgan Expansion (BROKE) claiming huge damages.

Below are a number of links to informative articles and other documents about that case and about SLAPP suits in general.

 

Financial Clout v. Right to Speak Out

Kinder Morgan v. Freedom of Speech

BC Pipeline-Protest Case Shows How Lawsuits Threaten Democratic Voices

How should we slap back at SLAPPs?

Lessons from a fish farm defamation lawsuit

Kim Benson

The West Coast Environmental Law SLAPP Handbook

Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic

Strategic lawsuit against public participation

Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation: The British Columbia Experience