Co-hosting the next in our series of community town hall meetings

Author
Sven Biggs
Burnaby is home to Kinder Morgan’s Westridge Marine Terminal. If Kinder Morgan gets their way, as many as 350 oil tankers a year will fill up with tar sands crude at that terminal by 2017. It was not far from this terminal that a pipeline rupture and oil spill occurred in 2007.

As one of the frontline communities on the pipeline route, Burnaby is key to both Kinder Morgan’s plans to vastly expand tar sands exports and tanker traffic in the Salish Sea, and our campaign to stop them.

Fortunately, people in Burnaby are already coming together to stand up to Kinder Morgan. Recently, concerned residents formed a new local group called Burnaby Residents Opposed to Kinder Morgan Expansion, or BROKE for short.

Tanker Free BC, along with our allies at the Wilderness Committee, are really excited to be co-hosting the next in our series of community town hall meetings on the Kinder Morgan proposal for a new Trans-Mountain pipeline with the folks from BROKE.

The town hall will be on October 10th at 7pm at the Confederation Community Centre at 4585 Albert St.

We will hear from Burnaby Mayor Derek Corrigan and Burnaby Douglas MP Kennedy Stewart, two local elected representatives who have been outspoken in their concerns about the pipeline.

We really hope that you will join us at this event, which we believe will be an important step in building community opposition in Burnaby.

Please also take the time to invite your friends and family, especially if they live in the Burnaby area! You can forward them this email or invite them on Facebook here.

Sven Biggs
Campaign Director |Tanker Free BC
PS We have a lot of other great events coming up this fall find out more by visiting the events calendar on our website.

Tanker Free BC
http://www.tankerfreebc.org/

BROKE hosts town hall on pipeline expansion

Author
Wanda Chow
By Wanda Chow – Burnaby NewsLeader
Published: October 04, 2012 11:00 AM
Updated: October 04, 2012 1:41 PM

Burnaby Residents Opposed to Kinder Morgan Expansion (BROKE) hosts its first town hall meeting on Oct. 10 to raise awareness of its concerns about the proposed expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline.

And while members of the recently-formed group debated over whether to invite Kinder Morgan Canada to send a representative, in the end they didn’t.

“We figured Richard Kinder has enough money, he can do his own advertising,” said Karl Perrin, a BROKE spokesperson, referring to the parent company’s CEO and chairman.

“Because our name is Burnaby Residents Opposed to Kinder Morgan Expansion, so we’re not trying to fool anybody. We are opposed.”

The group, whose members and supporters number about 50, was started initially by residents of Westridge, the North Burnaby neighbourhood where Kinder Morgan’s pipeline was ruptured by an excavator in 2007.

“They bonded to some extent because of the disaster in 2007 with oil in their neighbourhood,” Perrin said. “When they heard about the expansion, they thought,

‘wait a minute, we’ve got to do something about it.'”

The pipeline runs from Edmonton to Burnaby and the proposed expansion would increase its capacity from the current 300,000 barrels per day (bpd) to 750,000 bpd to allow for increased exports of bitumen crude oil from the Alberta oil sands to overseas markets.

BROKE members did some door-to-door canvassing a month ago, Perrin said. “Pretty well everyone had heard about it and pretty well everyone was opposed.”

The group’s concerns largely revolve around the proposal’s potential impact on the environment. Increased tanker traffic would increase the likelihood of an oil spill in Burrard Inlet and the diluted bitumen is much more difficult to clean up than regular crude, he said. That, and the potential for local properties to be expropriated for the project.

Speakers at the town hall will include Mayor Derek Corrigan, Burnaby-Douglas NDP MP Kennedy Stewart, Rueben George of the Tsleil-Waututh First Nation, Sven Biggs of Tanker Free BC and/or Ben West of the Wilderness Committee.

BROKE member Mary Hatch will also speak about her experience having her Westridge home sprayed by oil in 2007, from the firefighter knocking on her door telling her to evacuate to the years of disruption during the remediation.

The town hall will be held Wednesday, Oct. 10, 7 p.m. at Confederation Seniors Centre, 4585 Albert St., Burnaby (near Willingdon Avenue).

wchow@burnabynewsleader.com

twitter.com/WandaChow

Opposition to Trans Mountain pipeline nearing Northern Gateway levels

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/bc-poll-finds-staunch-opposition-to-pair-of-pipelines/article4551051/

Once a little-known factor in plans to carry oil to Canada’s West Coast, expansion of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline now faces a level of public opposition almost as high as Enbridge Inc.’s controversial Northern Gateway project.

A new poll finds that 60.3 per cent of British Columbians surveyed are against Gateway, while 49.9 per cent oppose the twinning of the Trans Mountain system, a half-century-old pipe that already carries substantial volumes of Alberta oil to Burnaby, B.C.

VIDEO
Video: Former environment minister slams Enbridge pipeline plan

Those surveyed were asked to name which issue they saw as most important in B.C. and, unprompted, pipelines got the second-highest number of votes – behind the economy but above health care, the environment, unemployment and education.

The poll was commissioned by the Living Oceans Society, an environmental group that has sought to keep oil tankers off the B.C. coast. Nonetheless it provides an insight into the deepening public opposition facing the oil patch as it seeks to access new, and lucrative, Pacific markets for its product.

The opposition to Trans Mountain is especially striking, since Kinder Morgan is seeking to expand an existing pipeline and terminal used to load oil tankers. In other words, oil already moves to the B.C. Lower Mainland through Trans Mountain in substantial volumes. The Enbridge project, on the other hand, promises to bring oil to the northern B.C. coast where oil movements today are very limited.

Kinder Morgan also has yet to formally apply for the Trans Mountain expansion, and won’t even publish a map of its proposed route until late next year, when it makes that application. Enbridge is already in the midst of a prolonged and hotly-debated federal review that has brought forth thousands of public comments.

Yet a telephone survey of those along the Kinder Morgan route – the survey also included Vancouver, which lies beyond the pipeline but next to waters where tankers would sail – found substantial opposition to the expansion project.

“Those that think Kinder Morgan is a much different animal, in terms of the average person, than Enbridge are mistaken,” said Bob Penner, CEO of Stratcom, the left-leaning communication strategy and polling firm that conducted the survey. “People are seeing them both very similarly. They’re not buying the positive arguments for them and they’re not buying that there’s a big difference between Kinder Morgan and Enbridge.”

The poll of those along the route tapped 768 people. A separate online poll of British Columbians obtained 1,012 responses. While Stratcom said it sought to present neutral questions, both polls employed questionable language in some instances, by suggesting Trans Mountain transports only bitumen, or heavy oil sands crude, rather than the broader variety of oil and refined products that the pipe actually carries.

The B.C.-wide poll found support for both projects at low levels, with 19.9 per cent of people behind Gateway, and 21.9 per cent behind Kinder Morgan. In both cases, the number of British Columbians that have maintained an open mind is low: 15.6 per cent declared themselves neutral on Trans Mountain, and 10.2 per cent neither supported nor opposed Gateway.

The low levels of support come as Trans Mountain mounts an increasingly widespread campaign to win public favour. The company now has a half-dozen people on its community engagement team, some strategically hired from communities along the pipeline route.

In October, it will launch a series of public information sessions along the pipeline route, and is also developing an online platform where “there will be forums and discussions and opportunities to provide feedback to our website,” said Lizette Parsons Bell, the expansion project’s lead for stakeholder engagement and communications.

“We hope and trust that British Columbians, and all Canadians, will take the time to learn the facts about the project in order to make an informed opinion and engage us with a real dialogue based on facts,” she said.

However, she declined comment on whether the company would be willing to amend its route – a route it has resisted making public – based on public input, saying such questions would need to be posed to the expansion project’s manager. The precise route of a pipeline is often amongst the most contentious elements its proponent faces.

Resistance to the expansion is not uniform. There is greater support than opposition amongst those who vote Liberal and Conservative – although Mr. Penner points out that with a quarter of Conservatives opposed, it’s enough to put in jeopardy some Conservative seats in the province. Among those who supported the expansion, its benefits to the economy ranked as the top reason; other factors included its contribution to jobs and the fact a pipeline already exists along that route.

Still, a demand from Premier Christy Clark that B.C. take a greater share of revenue from pipelines like revenue appears to be doing little. Of those polled, 29.7 per cent said more money from Gateway would make them more likely to support the project, while 25.2 per cent say they would grow less likely to support it.

“With these polls as a whole, it’s clear that for every single party, [pipelines] are a political vulnerability,” said Tzeporah Berman, one of B.C.’s best-known environmentalists, who now consults for numerous organizations.

Community speaks out against existing pipeline

By Nadine Moedt (The Cascade) – Email

Print Edition: September 12, 2012

While most environmentally- concerned British Columbians are focused on the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline, many are unaware that an existing pipeline is already carrying diluted tar sands bitumen right through our backyard.

The Trans-Mountain pipeline was built in the early ‘50s, and was intended to transport conventional oil for local use. However in 2005, Kinder Morgan (an American energy company) purchased the line and has instead been using the pipeline for transporting tar sands bitumen to the coast for export.

Now, Kinder Morgan has submitted a new proposal hoping to put in another pipeline parallel to the first.

Sheila Muxlow is a member of a group of concerned local residents known as PIPE UP (pro-information, pro-environment united people). The goal of PIPE UP, Muxlow says, is education and awareness about “the risks associated with transporting tar sands diluted bitumen.”

Public knowledge of the pipeline and its proposed twin line is limited, especially in comparison to public awareness of the Northern Gateway proposal.

“We don’t have stringent regulations when it comes to moving tar sands,” Muxlow said, explaining how Kinder Morgan was able to switch product without informing the public of the change. “Overall [the lack of awareness] has to do with the lack of regulations that exist for big companies to have to be transparent with the public when they are using old infrastructure to transport new product, regardless of how increased the toxicity is or the increased risk of spills.”

Kinder Morgan’s proposed expansion would mean a brand new pipeline from Edmonton to the coast. It would cross the Lower Mainland close to schools, residential areas, farmland, watersheds and drinking water sources.

PIPE UP’s major concern is that tar sand diluted bitumen is much more at risk of spillage than conventional oil.

“On a local level, the fact that tar sands diluted bitumen is more subject to spills is an issue because it is a more corrosive product,” Muxlow explained. “Tar sands at room temperature are solid, so to move it through a pipeline they have to dilute it with a cocktail of different solvents including benzene and other polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Then even so, when they get it to a state where it is fluid, they’ll have to pump it at higher temperatures, and at higher pressure to get it through the pipeline.”

This is an issue of concern even in brand new pipes, Muxlow said, let alone in a pipeline built in the early ‘50s. The Keystone pipeline, running from Alberta to Nebraska was built in 2010 and was designed specifically for transport of tar sand diluted bitumen. In its first year alone there were 12 instances of spillage.

An oil spill in the Fraser Valley would not only have a huge impact environmentally, Muxlow stated, but would be a significant hazard to human health.

“There is the issue with increased health risks for residents, with the chemical cocktail of dilutants they add to tar sands to move it through the pipes,” she said. “When it’s spilled, it evaporates into the air quite quickly. When it does that, it is this really noxious, odorous cloud that lingers in the air.”

Long-term effects are not fully understood, but benzene, which is a major component of the product, has been directly linked to blood cancer.

Michael Hale, who is a member of PIPE UP, was shocked to learn that the pipeline runs directly under his farmland, and that diluted bitumen is already being transported through his property. After the shock wore away, Hale became determined to know more.

“We have all these hearings for Enbridge northern gateway pipeline, yet suddenly there’s tar sands being shipped right here,” Hale says. “We have to talk about what our community wants and other alternatives.”

Hale looked specifically at the economics of the pipeline, trying to determine any benefits of an expansion.

“We are getting royalties,” Hale explained, “and that would double, but it’s still a pittance.”

“The other thing that really smacks you in the eye,” he continued, “is that the companies don’t address the economic costs and environmental risks associated with any spill. If you have a big spill, that comes to hundreds and millions of dollars in costs to clean up.”

This is the outcome that PIPE UP is struggling against.

“If we can stop Kinder Morgan from transporting tar sand diluted bitumen,” Muxlow concluded, “that would send a really strong message that this is not a piece of infrastructure that we want as part of our economy. We don’t want to be a doormat. The best way to help achieve that is just public awareness.”

http://ufvcascade.ca/2012/09/17/community-speaks-out-against-existing-pipeline/

Residents organize townhall meeting on pipeline

Burnaby Now
editorial@burnabynow.com

September 22, 2012

Dear Editor:

RE: Kinder Morgan’s response to townhall meeting

Kinder Morgan’s response to a planned townhall meeting is to claim that the company has a good safety record for shipping “diluted bitumen” (tar sands diluted with a cocktail of toxic hydrocarbons) and that diluted bitumen is no more “corrosive” than other types of crude oil (Burnaby Now, September 19, 2012).

Both of Kinder Morgan’s claims deserve close scrutiny.

First, Kinder Morgan “has declined to provide details on spill incidents in the past decade, but National Energy Board data show there have been nine leaks on the pipeline since 2002, which spilled a total of nearly 4,800 barrels of oil.”(1) The major incidents were at Sumas tank farm in 2005 and at the Burnaby terminal in 2009. Evacuations took place in Burnaby in areas near Government Road in 2009 and Forest Grove in 2010.

Second, diluted bitumen is derived from tar sands which is relatively solid at room temperature. This solid matter must be super heated, mixed with toxic cocktail of hydrocarbons and placed under intense pressure in order to transport it by pipeline. While it is true that some industry groups maintain that diluted bitumen is not anymore “corrosive” than conventional crude, many science based studies, have shown that diluted bitumen is more abrasive and thus more likely to cause increased risk of damage to pipes and related infastructure.(2)

In fact, refiners have found that tar sands derived crude contains significantly higher quantities of abrasive quartz sand particles than conventional crude. These studies maintain that the combination of chemical corrosion and physical abrasion can dramatically increase the rate of pipeline deterioration.

This is not to mention the problem of trying to clean-up diluted bitumen when, not if, spills occur. The main problem is that when the solvents used to transport tar sands dissipate, the resulting heavy oil tends to sink. If spilled bitumen is not located and cleaned up within hours of a spill, the heavy oil sinks in water and/or soil making it virtually impossible to remove. This was amply demonstrated in the recent massive spill near Kalamazoo, Michigan. (3)

I urge everyone to learn more and discuss the facts. The planned Townhall Meeting on October 10, 2012 at Confederation Park will help shed more light on heavy oil.

Yours,

Alan Williams

_________________
End Notes

1) http://www.vancouversun.com/technology/Pipeline+safety+records+under+scrutiny+more/6949239/story.html#ixzz216cI8TzE

2) Crude Oil Quality Association, Standard Handbook of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, Planning Ahead for Effective Canadian Crude Processing, the National Association of Corrosion Engineers, and the National Petrochemical and Refiners Association.

3) http://www.huffingtonpost.com/henry-henderson/kalamazoo-river-spill-two_b_1700343.html

By Jennifer Moreau, Burnaby Now September 19, 2012

Burnaby residents opposed to Kinder Morgan’s pipeline expansion are holding a meeting to inform the public about the company’s plan to more than double oil shipments from Alberta to Burnaby.

“If you live in Burnaby, you are either directly affected by this proposed pipeline expansion or you know somebody who is,” said Mary Hatch of Burnaby Residents Opposing Kinder Morgan Expansion in a press release.

Kinder Morgan is planning to twin the Trans Mountain pipeline, increasing capacity from 300,000 barrels of oil per day to 750,000. The line was built in the 1950s and transports various types of oil products, including diluted bitumen, a blend of solid petroleum and condensate. The residents’ group stated that bitumen poses an increased risk in the event of an oil spill because the condensate evaporates and the bitumen sinks to the ocean or river floor.

“We want to see the threat of toxic spills reduced, not increased,” said Karl Perrin, a member of the group. “Hosting a town hall meeting allows us to get some very knowledgeable people in front of concerned Burnaby residents.”

The group also raised concerns about increased tanker traffic in the Burrard Inlet and Kinder Morgan’s plan to double capacity at the tank farm on Burnaby Mountain, as well as higher temperatures and pressures required to ship the diluted bitumen. Roughly a third of Kinder Morgan’s current shipments is bitumen diluted with condensate or synthetic crude, but the company can’t say how much it plans to move through the lines in the future if the expansion plan is approved. Kinder Morgan’s engineering director Michael Davies likened the transport of diluted bitumen to other forms of heavy crude.

“We haven’t seen any unusual corrosion or have had and other problems with

diluted bitumen,” Davies said. “At pipeline temperature, it’s not more acidic or corrosive than conventional crude oil.”

The first town hall meeting will be held Wednesday, Oct. 10, at 7 p.m. at Confederation Seniors’ Centre, at 4585 Albert St. Speakers will include Rueben George of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation, Burnaby-Douglas MP Kennedy Stewart, Mayor Derek Corrigan, Mary Hatch from the residents’ group, and Ben West and Sven Biggs from the Wilderness Committee and Tanker Free B.C.

BROKE was recently formed by local residents, some of whom were directly affected by the 2007 Kinder Morgan pipeline spill.
© Copyright (c) Burnaby Now

Read more: http://www.burnabynow.com/news/Residents+organize+townhall+meeting+pipeline/7264205/story.html#ixzz26wb5U2se

News Release: Burnaby Townhall Meeting

Burnaby Residents Opposed to Kinder Morgan Expansion (BROKE) is hosting a Town Hall Meeting on Wednesday, October 10, 2012 at 7 PM to inform residents about Kinder Morgan’s plan to build a new pipeline that will ship crude bitumen from Alberta to Burrard Inlet.

“We want to see the threat of toxic spills reduced, not increased,” said Karl Perrin of BROKE. “Hosting a Town Hall meeting allows us to get some very knowledgeable people in front of concerned Burnaby residents.”

“A lot of people are assuming that the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline through Burnaby is business as usual, but there are some differences that significantly elevate the environmental risks to our community,” said Karl.

In fact:

• Instead of light crude, the pipeline will carry dirty oil from the tar sands diluted in a toxic mix of chemicals that are not publicly disclosed for proprietary reasons

• To move the bitumen and chemical slurry Kinder Morgan will have to ship it using intense heat and pressure, both of which elevate the risk of catastrophic pipeline failures

• Pipeline capacity will more than double, necessitating a dramatic expansion of storage tank capacity on Burnaby Mountain

• Increased pipeline capacity will result in enormous oil tankers in Burrard Inlet and the Georgia Basin

• Bitumen spills pose a significant problem because bitumin sinks after the condensate evaporates and cannot be cleaned from the rivers or ocean floor – a “minor” spill of semi-refined crude oil on Inlet Drive near the Barnet Highway five years ago is still being “cleaned up”

• The closure of the Canada Coast Guard station on Kitsilano Point will mean slower response times for spills in Burrard Inlet and English Bay

• Federal requirements to ensure our environment is protected have been gutted; decision making regarding pipeline projects has been removed from the National Energy Board by a government determined to export Canadian resources and jobs to Asian markets

“If you live in Burnaby, you are either directly affected by this proposed pipeline expansion, or you know somebody who is,” said Mary Hatch of BROKE. “Do we really want to put our community at risk for the benefit of Texas billionaires?”

Each part of Kinder Morgan’s planned expansion requires careful public consideration and debate because of the health and safety risks to people and the environment.

Get the facts on Wednesday, October 10, 2012 at 7 PM at the Confederation Seniors’ Centre, 4585 Albert (near Willingdon, Burnaby, B.C.)

Speakers include :

• Rueben George, Tsleil-Waututh Nation
• Mary Hatch, BROKE
• Kennedy Stewart, MP Burnaby North
• Derek Corrigan, Mayor, City of Burnaby
• Sven Biggs/Ben West, Tanker Free BC/Wilderness Committee

– 30 –

Background:

The Town Hall meeting is hosted by the Burnaby Residents Opposing Kinder Morgan Expansion (BROKE). This is the first of a series of events and meetings designed to inform and engage the citizens of Burnaby and the Lower Mainland. BROKE is an autonomous organization working with several environmental organizations and groups.

Spokespersons:

Karl Perrin E-mail: perrink@shaw.ca, 604-872-7326, 778-887-7395
Elsie Dean E-mail: ewdean@telus.net, 604-294-5834

BROKE Website at www.brokepipelinewatch.ca (under construction)

For a map of the existing pipeline, go to http://kennedystewart.ndp.ca/download/2968/trans_mountain_pipeline_route…

To review the National Energy Board’s Pipeline Regulation In Canada: A Guide for Landowners and the Public go to http://www.neb-one.gc.ca/clf-nsi/rthnb/pblcprtcptn/pplnrgltncnd/pplnrglt…

Tags:

Burnaby Residents Opposed to Kinder Morgan Expansion (BROKE) is hosting a Town Hall Meeting on Wednesday, October 10, 2012 at 7 PM to inform residents about Kinder Morgan’s plan to build a new pipeline that will ship crude bitumen from Alberta to Burrard Inlet.

“We want to see the threat of toxic spills reduced, not increased,” said Karl Perrin of BROKE. “Hosting a Town Hall meeting allows us to get some very knowledgeable people in front of concerned Burnaby residents.”

“A lot of people are assuming that the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline through Burnaby is business as usual, but there are some differences that significantly elevate the environmental risks to our community,” said Karl.

In fact:

• Instead of light crude, the pipeline will carry dirty oil from the tar sands diluted in a toxic mix of chemicals that are not publicly disclosed for proprietary reasons

• To move the bitumen and chemical slurry Kinder Morgan will have to ship it using intense heat and pressure, both of which elevate the risk of catastrophic pipeline failures

• Pipeline capacity will more than double, necessitating a dramatic expansion of storage tank capacity on Burnaby Mountain

• Increased pipeline capacity will result in enormous oil tankers in Burrard Inlet and the Georgia Basin

• Bitumen spills pose a significant problem because bitumin sinks after the condensate evaporates and cannot be cleaned from the rivers or ocean floor – a “minor” spill of semi-refined crude oil on Inlet Drive near the Barnet Highway five years ago is still being “cleaned up”

• The closure of the Canada Coast Guard station on Kitsilano Point will mean slower response times for spills in Burrard Inlet and English Bay

• Federal requirements to ensure our environment is protected have been gutted; decision making regarding pipeline projects has been removed from the National Energy Board by a government determined to export Canadian resources and jobs to Asian markets

“If you live in Burnaby, you are either directly affected by this proposed pipeline expansion, or you know somebody who is,” said Mary Hatch of BROKE. “Do we really want to put our community at risk for the benefit of Texas billionaires?”

Each part of Kinder Morgan’s planned expansion requires careful public consideration and debate because of the health and safety risks to people and the environment.

Get the facts on Wednesday, October 10, 2012 at 7 PM at the Confederation Seniors’ Centre, 4585 Albert (near Willingdon, Burnaby, B.C.)

Speakers include :

• Rueben George, Tsleil-Waututh Nation
• Kennedy Stewart, MP Burnaby North
• Derrick Corrigan, Mayor, City of Burnaby
• Sven Biggs/Ben West, Tanker Free BC/Wilderness Committee
• Mary Hatch, BROKE

– 30 –

Background:

The Town Hall meeting is hosted by the Burnaby Residents Opposing Kinder Morgan Expansion (BROKE). This is the first of a series of events and meetings designed to inform and engage the citizens of Burnaby and the Lower Mainland. BROKE is an autonomous organization working with several environmental organizations and groups.

Spokespersons:

Karl Perrin E-mail: perrink@shaw.ca, 604-872-7326, 778-887-7395
Elsie Dean E-mail: ewdean@telus.net, 604-294-5834

BROKE Website at www.brokepipelinewatch.ca (under construction)

For a map of the existing pipeline, go to http://kennedystewart.ndp.ca/download/2968/trans_mountain_pipeline_route_map.pdf

To review the National Energy Board’s Pipeline Regulation In Canada: A Guide for Landowners and the Public go to http://www.neb-one.gc.ca/clf-nsi/rthnb/pblcprtcptn/pplnrgltncnd/pplnrgltncnd-eng.pdf