January 212017 Musical evening with BROKE

Dennis Lakusta,
with Terry Porter on acoustic bass in a
Fundraising concert for
Admission $15.00. All proceeds to BROKE
Sat. Jan.21st at Cranberry Commons
4274 Albert St. Burnaby,
(one block north of Hastings,
3rd block west of Willingdon)

Doors open at 7:00PM
Concert starts at 7:30PM

To reserve:
Janie Benna 604 454 1771
jlbenna@gmail.com
Dennis Lakusta 1 250 802 8054
Ruth Walmsley 604 298 9220
ruth@cranberrycommons.ca

\Dennis Lakusta – In addition to being a noted artist in visual media, Dennis, is a musician, singer and songwriter with eight or more CDs to his credit (some of which may be available). He can make you laugh, cry, cringe, or rage at injustice. Please check out Dennis’ new website at http://dlakusta.org/ Never one to shy away from thorny issues including the blind and wanton destruction of our planet and the flagrant assault of our most basic rights and civil liberties, Dennis, a strong activist of Cree ancestry, gives a Fundraising benefit concert for BROKE.

BROKE Burnaby Residents Opposing Kinder Morgan Expansion, originating in 2011, is a group of local residents who led the fight against Kinder Morgan, and who were in the ranks of the many arrested making a stand on Burnaby Mountain in 2014. With the recent Federal approval of the Kinder Morgan expansion BROKE will again be at the forefront in the fight to oppose the degradation of our city, our neighbourhoods, and the natural habitat, that an oil pipeline and related industrialization of Burrard Inlet would bring.

Videos from the BROKE Town Halls Sept.2016

View 10-minute video with highlights from both town halls here:

Click the links below to watch the YouTube videos from our September 21st and 28th, 2016, Town Halls.

Damien Stalaston clip: https://youtu.be/O5FzK0xwQUY

Robyn Allan clip: https://youtu.be/_XM7FjJFgUU

Holly Arntzen clip: https://youtu.be/oqfW19_rOX4

Rueben George clip: https://youtu.be/E1m8KTZHgno

Audrey Seigl clip: https://youtu.be/etH0ckJGDaM

Dipak Dattani and Chris Bowcock clip: https://youtu.be/w36gMU1ov_o

Holly Arntzen with Ruth Walmsley clip: https://youtu.be/2VtzuPeJs50

Seth Klein clip: https://youtu.be/T47XmoAv0mw

Kate Hodgson clip: https://youtu.be/37xPvdka3wQ

BROKE Town Halls scheduled as window for federal panel input closes

2-town-hallsWith the Kinder Morgan TMX Panel deadline to voice concerns about the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion fast approaching, Burnaby Residents Opposing Kinder Morgan Expansion (BROKE) has organized two more town halls for residents to learn about the risks associated with the project.

“We only have a few weeks to voice our concerns to the Ministerial Panel examining the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion project,” said BROKE spokesperson Ruth Walmsley. “The deadline for online submissions is September 30.”Read more…

Burnaby Residents Opposing Kinder Morgan Expansion

BROKE is a group of local residents whose mission is:
• To prevent the expansion of the Kinder Morgan Pipeline, and related infrastructure in Burnaby, and related supertanker traffic, through education, advocacy and partnership;
• To oppose the degradation of our city, our neighbourhoods, and the natural habitat, that an oil pipeline and related industrialization of Burrard Inlet would bring;
• To raise awareness of Burnaby residents about how the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion and increased tanker traffic would impact our community and local environment;
• To promote a clean and sustainable energy future.

Child Safety, Zoning By-laws and the Oil Industry

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Burnaby: December 31, 2012

Residents of Burnaby call on Mayor Derek Corrigan to scrap city by-laws that allow schools, daycares and residential developments to be built near refineries, oil tanks, substations and pipelines. The risk of leaks and spills of combustible oil and carcinogenic gases is unacceptable and should have never been allowed.

Elsie Dean of BROKE says, “We should not have to wait for a major catastrophe before we act. Schools and daycares should never have been built near oil facilities in the first place and we need to ensure that they never will again. Like gun control, we should be thinking about laws to protect children before a crisis occurs. Schools and housing developments must be protected from carcinogenic and combustible gases.”

The potential health risks to children in schools near or adjacent to oil pipelines is underlined by the tragedy in Fallon, Nevada. A lawsuit launched by a Nevada mother against Kinder Morgan alleges that the company failed to adequately monitor and repair a pipeline that was leaking jet fuel beneath a school playground and that the leak contributed to a cluster of childhood cancer cases at the school and the death of one child.

There are warnings about noxious gases strategically placed throughout the areas where tank farms, oil pipelines and substations have been allowed. Yet schools like Burnaby North Senior, and Forest Grove and Seaforth Elementary sit close to, or below, major oil facilities. Others like Stoney Creek and Lyndhurst Elementary and a YMCA childcare center sits just meters from both highly combustible jet fuel and heavy oil pipelines that carry a soup of toxic chemicals.

There have been major spills and leaks near these and other schools, daycares and residences throughout the years 2007 , 2008 , 2009 and 2010 . All have required an emergency response and evacuations, costing tax payers thousands of dollars. In January 2012, residences and a private school also had to be closed in Sumas.

Tax payers have always borne the costs associated with emergency response, including evacuations and medical care resulting from oil pipeline failure, oil spills and noxious gases from tank farms and substations.

Commenting on the cost to tax payers, Elsie Dean makes the point that “The companies that are found responsible for spills and oil pipeline ruptures should pay not only for clean up, but for all emergency response and medical care as well. The cost to tax payers of emergencies has not been factored into the expense of oil pipelines, tank farms, and sub-stations. Nor have the costs of routine air monitoring near the oil refinery on Burrard Inlet. When Kinder Morgan promises a few million in tax payments, it should be balanced against the hidden costs to tax payers of maintaining a huge oil infrastructure in Burnaby.”

In response to the concern about children’s health in schools and daycares near oil infrastructure, BROKE calls on all levels of government as well as the Union of British Columbia Municipalities and the Federation of Canadian Municipalities to recommend that oil industries should not be zoned near schools, daycares and residences and that all measures must be employed to separate dangerous industries from homes and schools. Children’s safety should be the first priority for every level of government.

– 30 –

For more information please email info@brokepipelinewatch.ca

1. The Burnaby Teacher’s Association has already passed a resolution on December 4, 2012 to demand the Burnaby school district monitor oil pipelines for leaks and develop comprehensive evacuations plans for schools near tank farms, refineries and substations.
2. Kinder Morgan plead guilty to negligence in the 2007 pipeline rupture and found negligent by the National Energy Board in the 2012 incident.
3. http://www.mynews4.com/news/local/story/fallon-cancer-cluster/–P1ofP56UqVNbV3tPtJDg.cspx

Pipeline protester fights Kinder Morgan lawsuit

by Stefania Seccia, QMI Agency

VANCOUVER — A Burnaby, B.C. man argued in court on Tuesday that a multi-million-dollar lawsuit filed by Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain Pipeline is an attempt to stifle democratic activities.

Alan Dutton, a member of Burnaby Residents Opposing Kinder Morgan Expansion and a defendant in the $5.6-million lawsuit seeking damages against the protesters, is refusing to settle out of court.

In B.C. Supreme Court on Tuesday, Dutton said the case was an abuse of process and highlighted the need for anti-SLAPP (Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation) legislation.

Josh Paterson, the executive director of the B.C. Civil Liberties Association, said it’s up to the defendant and his counsel to prove that the lawsuit filed by Kinder Morgan was a strategic lawsuit against public participation.

“From our perspective, we’ve said that there needs to be legislation in this province that makes it easier and faster for so-called SLAPP lawsuits to be identified and disposed of,” he said.

Paterson said the province had legislation in place until 2001 that expedited the court’s determination as to whether a case was a SLAPP suit.

The BCCLA is calling on the province to reinstate such legislation.

While B.C. Minister of Justice Suzanne Anton was unavailable for an interview, a ministry spokesperson said the province “is in line with most Canadian jurisdictions which do not provide for what is sometimes described as ‘anti-SLAPP’ legislation.”

“The challenge with such legislation is determining the basis for dismissing a civil claim prior to a hearing on its merits,” the spokesperson wrote in a statement.

The decision on whether a case is legitimate or not is up to the court’s discretion, according to Section 18 of the Supreme Court Act, which outlines general criteria for what constitutes a frivolous claim.

Trans Mountain deferred comment about the court case until it is officially concluded.

The case will be back in court on Wednesday.

Pipeline galvanizes crowd at all-candidates meet

Nearly 100 Burnaby residents came out on a rainy Sunday evening to hear Burnaby North candidates speak about the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion project, among other things.

Kinder Morgan wants to twin the Trans Mountain line, which runs oil – as well as diluted bitumen – from Alberta to the West Coast and a terminal in Burnaby.

The all-candidates meeting was put on by the Capitol Hill Community Hall Association, the Civic Association of Iranian Canadians and BROKE – Burnaby Residents Opposing Kinder Morgan Expansion. The format included four written questions from the audience and six oral questions.

The first question was on whether candidates were aware of the potential health effects of a diluted bitumen spill.

Conservative Party of B.C. candidate Wayne Marklund said he didn’t know what the health effects might be but added his party is in favour of the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion project.

“I’m an open-minded person,” he said. “I know my party believes in pipelines and believes in good paying jobs for British Columbians.”

But Marklund added he personally believes the environment should come first and all safety standards need to be looked into.

Green Party of B.C. candidate Carrie McLaren said she also wasn’t aware of the effects, but did a quick Wikipedia check at the meeting.

“I already figured out it’s oil and it’s also diluted with other chemicals, so it’s obviously partially carcinogenic, and there are other effects we don’t know of fully because it hasn’t been fully researched,” she said. “Obviously, our stance is we don’t want the expansion of any more of the pipelines in B.C. or in Burnaby. We want to phase ourselves out of the fossil fuels with these big health problems.”

B.C. NDP candidate Janet Routledge said she is also concerned about the potential effects.

It’s my understanding that the components of bitumen are a trade secret, so we don’t know exactly what’s in it,” she said. “But we do know that as a result of the spill near Sumas, there were a number of people that were hospital-

ized. I do think we should be worried not only about the short-term effects but the long-term effects.”

B.C. Liberal candidate Richard Lee, who scan has been MLA in the riding since 2001, said the other candidates don’t know much about the risk and added he didn’t either.

“I think bitumen has been around for so many years, if there are negative health (effects) I think we (would) be talking about it already,” he said. “I’d like to find out more.”

Residents also asked written questions on other topics, such as whether candidates would stop making contracts with private power producers for independent power projects.

Lee responded to that, saying such project create jobs and energy for the community.

Routledge and McLaren both said their parties would look into it. Marklund said the current agreements are long-term binding contracts that cannot be broken, no matter what party is in power.

“Unfortunately, British Columbians will have to pay for this for many years,” he said.

Other questions included concerns about employment levels in the province, support for small businesses, concerns about B.C. Hydro’s smart meters, services for seniors and proportional representation.

At the end of the evening, Burnaby councillor Pietro Calendino asked the final question in regards to the pipeline project.

He directed it specifically to the Liberal and Conservative candidates but each of the four candidates was given the chance to answer, as per the meeting rules.

After speaking about his knowledge of the proposed pipeline project, Calendino asked if it was worth the risk to the environment and human health, and worth the disruption to residents who live along the pipeline route, for a handful of jobs.

Routledge responded that it didn’t seem worth it to her.

Lee said economic benefits do come with some risks, as did the introduction of the Chevron refinery into Burnaby many years ago.

“Personally, we are not living in a perfect world,” he said. “If I could, I’d ask Chevron to move. I would like to have a clean environment for our residents.”

Marklund said his party thinks the pipelines are the key to creating better paying jobs, but added the party would sit down for a strong discussion on the issue after the televised leadership debate.

McLaren said if the B.C. government’s focus had been on moving toward using green renewable resources, the discussion wouldn’t about pipeline risks wouldn’t be necessary.

“We don’t need any more damn pipelines,” she added.

© Copyright (c) Burnaby Now

Kinder Morgan Town Hall at Stoney Creek June 28

The Stoney Creek Environmental Committee in cooperation with community and environmental groups is hosting a series of public forums to examine Kinder Morgan’s plan to expand the Trans Mountain Pipeline, increase tanker traffic through the Georgia Straight and expand oil tank capacity on Burnaby Mountain. The Kinder Morgan pipeline now ships 300,000 barrels of oil per day this amount is planned to increase to over 750,000 barrels per day. The planned expansion will require that a new pipeline be built through Burnaby, oil tanker traffic dramatically increased through Georgia Straight and Burrard Inlet and expanded oil tank storage capacity on Burnaby Mountain.

Each element of Kinder Morgan’s planned expansion requires careful consideration and debate. Experts on the impact of the planned expansion have been invited to speak to increase information about the planned expansion and to provide an opportunity for public input.

Speakers: Michael Hale, Pipe-Up Network, Sven Biggs, No Tankers and Kennedy Stewart, MP Burnaby NorthRead more…

Kinder Morgan Town Hall: No Pipelines, No Tankers, No Problem

WHAT: Kinder Morgan Town Hall: No Pipelines, No Tankers, No Problem

WHEN: Thursday, Apr. 11th, 7pm

WHERE: Vic Theatre, 808 Douglas St., downtown Victoria

WHO: All are welcome! Presented by Sierra Club BC with support from Wilderness Committee

Sponsors
Sierra Club BC, Wilderness Committee

Kinder Morgan Town Hall: No Pipelines, No Tankers, No Problem

Kinder Morgan Town Hall: No Pipelines, No Tankers, No Problem

Enbridge isn’t the only pipeline company in town. The US energy company Kinder Morgan plans to build a new pipeline to Burnaby, bring over 400 tankers a year carrying dirty oil past Victoria, and put the BC coast at risk of oil spills. It’s up to us to stop them.

Please join us for an evening of conversation on pipelines, tankers and climate change. Speakers will include Caitlyn Vernon (Coastal Campaigner and author of Nowhere Else on Earth); Ben West of ForestEthics Advocacy, Chief Andy Thomas of the Esquimalt First Nation, and Mayor Dean Fortin of Victoria.

Also joining us, via video, will be Bill McKibben, one of the world’s foremost climate change activists and co-founder of 350.org. And we will be showing, for the first time, a brand-new video focused on pipelines and climate change, featuring musician C.R. Avery.

This is sure to be an inspiring event. It’s free, and it begins at 7pm on Thursday, Apr. 11th at the Vic Theatre in downtown Victoria (808 Douglas St.).

Please RSVP on Facebook and invite your friends, or check out the event page on our website. Kinder Morgan’s pipeline is a threat to BC’s coast and the planet, and we must make our message clear: No Pipelines, No Tankers, No Problem!

WHAT: Kinder Morgan Town Hall: No Pipelines, No Tankers, No Problem

WHEN: Thursday, Apr. 11th, 7pm

WHERE: Vic Theatre, 808 Douglas St., downtown Victoria

WHO: All are welcome! Presented by Sierra Club BC with support from Wilderness Committee

COST: FREE!

QUESTIONS: Contact Galen Armstrong, galen@sierraclub.bc.ca, 250-386-5255 ext. 243

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/119024144953151/?notif_t=plan_edited

Caitlyn Vernon
Campaigner
Sierra Club BC

#304 – 733 Johnson Street, Victoria, BC V8W 3C7
Tel: (250) 386-5255 x222 Fax: (250) 386-4453
Cell: (250) 896-3500 www.sierraclub.bc.ca