Pipeline safety records under scrutiny as B.C. set to get more

Kinder Morgan says Trans Mountain project has seen only small leaks in the last decade

By Gordon Hoekstra, Vancouver Sun July 17, 2012

Pipeline safety records under scrutiny as B.C. set to get more

Boats clean up oil spilled in a Kinder Morgan crude oil pipeline rupture in 2007 along the shore of Burrard Inlet. The company announced Wednesday that its Trans Mountain pipeline expansion would be smaller than expected, after fewer shippers signed up.
Photograph by: Ian Lindsay, Vancouver Sun Files , Reuters

Kinder Morgan’s 1,150-kilometre Trans Mountain pipeline that transports oil from Alberta to southwestern B.C. has averaged about one leak a year in the past decade, but has not experienced the kind of major spill seen more recently in Alberta and Michigan from other pipelines.

“The pipeline is in many ways in better condition than when it was constructed almost 60 years ago,” said Kinder Morgan vice-president of operations engineering Hugh Harden.

“We have extensive integrity management programs that identify defects from original construction [and] removes them or repairs them. The tools we have today can see much smaller defects than we used to, maybe even 10 years ago,” he said.

The public’s interest in the risk of leaks on oil pipelines has been heightened in British Columbia, with two major projects moving forward in the province.

Kinder Morgan Canada has a $4.1-billion plan to twin its existing pipeline to tap into growing oil demand in Asia. And Enbridge is in the midst of a federal review of its $5.5-billion Northern Gateway project, also to ship oil to Asia.

But existing pipelines are also under the public microscope after a scathing National Transportation Safety Board report released last week found it took Enbridge 17 hours after the initial alarm to take action on an oil spill in Michigan in 2010. The report also noted Enbridge failed to fix the pipeline, despite knowing since 2004 it suffered from corrosion.

Harden said Kinder Morgan will be scrutinizing the U.S. safety board report on Enbridge for lessons. “Is there something we need to look at in our operations? Because nobody is perfect,” he said.

Kinder Morgan would only say it spends “tens of millions” annually maintaining and repairing the Trans Mountain line, declining to provide more detailed information for business reasons.

The company also declined to provide details on spill incidents in the past decade, but National Energy Board data show there have been nine leaks on the pipeline since 2002, which spilled a total of nearly 4,800 barrels of oil.

The largest pipeline spill took place in 2007, when about 1,400 barrels of oil leaked in Burnaby after an excavator punctured the line.

Two other spills of similar size took place in 2005 at the Sumas tank farm and in 2009 at the Burnaby terminal.

The other six spills were of much smaller sizes, including two in 2011: a nine-barrel spill at its Kamloops terminal, and a 10-barrel spill near Chip Lake, Alta.

In comparison, recent spills in Alberta and the Enbridge spill in 2010 in Michigan were larger.

A Plains Midstream pipeline leak in 2011 spilled about 28,000 barrels northeast of Peace River, Alta. Another Plains Midstream leak last month spilled up to 3,000 barrels into a tributary of the Red Deer River in west-central Alberta.

The Enbridge pipeline rupture in Michigan in 2010 spilled 21,000 barrels of oil, some of it into the Kalamazoo River.

Kinder Morgan says the integrity of the Trans Mountain pipeline has been helped by the fact it was built to the highest standards available in 1953, which included a plastic coating and cathodic protection system, which provides an electric current, to protect if from corrosion.

The company also uses specialized tools that examine the pipeline from inside to look for metal loss, cracks and deformations such as wrinkles. Pipeline sections are checked every five years.

The company will dig up and repair sections of the line when needed, said Harden.

The biggest section of line ever replaced was a 1.2-kilometre section under the Fraser River at the Port Mann Bridge in 2002, at a cost of about $5 million, noted Harden.

Environmental groups in British Columbia have taken a hard stand against pipeline expansion and have pointed to the record of existing pipelines in the province.

Western Wilderness Committee campaigner Ben West said he was skeptical of Kinder Morgan’s safety record in B.C.

“I guess just in the broader sense, it seems harder and harder to trust these oil companies at their word,” he said. “We hear from them they will do everything in their power to make these the safest pipelines possible. And it seems like every other week there’s something rupturing.”

B.C. Business Council executive vice-president Jock Finlayson said focusing in on a small number of pipeline spills is misleading because the overall safety record is good. But pipeline companies and regulators need to be prepared to disclose more information about their safety records because environmental groups have grown into formidable forces in Canada and the U.S., he said.

ghoekstra@vancouversun.com
© Copyright (c) The Vancouver Sun

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/Pipeline+safety+records+under+scrutiny+more/6949239/story.html#ixzz2GDKXltr1

NEB: Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC Sumas Tank 121 Leak

Author
NEB
http://www.neb-one.gc.ca/clf-nsi/rsftyndthnvrnmnt/sfty/nvstgtnrprt/trnsmntnsmstnk121lk/trnsmntnsmstnk121lk-eng.html

http://www.neb-one.gc.ca/clf-nsi/rsftyndthnvrnmnt/sfty/nvstgtnrprt/trnsmntnsmstnk121lk/trnsmntnsmstnk121lk-eng.pdf

Investigation under the National Energy Board Act In the Matter of 2012-01-24 Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC Sumas Tank 121 Leak [PDF 1060 KB]

FAQs – Final Investigation Report: Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC Sumas Tank 121 Leak

November, 2012

Copyright/Permission to Reproduce

Table of Contents

List of Appendices

List of Abbreviations and Definitions

1. Summary

2. Scope and Objectives of Investigation Under the National Energy Board Act (NEB Act)

3. Factual Information

3.1 Incident Description

4. Results of the Investigation Under the NEB Act

4.1 Failure Mechanism of the Tank Roof Drain System

Chapter 1 – Summary

On 24 January 2012, a release of 90 m³ of crude oil into the secondary containment of Tank 121 at Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC’s (TMPU) Sumas Terminal in Abbotsford, BC occurred. The investigation revealed that the leak occurred after a gasket in a flange pair of the Tank 121 roof drain system failed under excessive pressure caused by water freezing in the roof drain system.

Although TMPU had a new procedure requiring the tank roof drain valve to normally be closed, the tank roof drain valve was open at the time of the incident. This was a contributing factor to the incident. The investigation found that TMPU’s management of the procedural change to the normal drain valve position was inadequate.

The leak was detected later than it should have been. This can be attributed to the fact that the Control Centre Operator (CCO) did not follow TMPU’s procedures on two occasions when setting and responding to the alarms and failed to recognize the leak situation. The investigation found that there were improper alarm settings in TMPU’s new Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system and this may have contributed to the CCO’s inadequate response to the alarms.

The safety of Canadians and protection of the environment are the National Energy Board’s (NEB or Board) top priorities. The Board requires pipeline companies to anticipate, prevent, manage and mitigate potentially dangerous conditions associated with their pipelines. TMPU has identified corrective actions to address all of the findings of cause and contributing factors identified in this investigation report. The Board is satisfied that these actions are appropriate to prevent the occurrence of similar incidents in the future.

Cleanup continues on B.C. oil spill

Cleanup continued Tuesday on a major oil spill that has forced residents of a Burnaby, B.C., neighbourhood from at least 50 homes, and raised serious environmental concerns.

A pipeline was ruptured at Inlet Drive and Ridge Drive in Burnaby, B.C., spilling oil in the neighbourhood.
(CBC)
By late afternoon, the spill, which crept down to the waters of Burrard Inlet, was contained.

But officials were still assessing how much crude oil was spilled, after a construction crew’s backhoe inadvertently broke a pipeline that connected a refinery to a refuelling facility in the harbour.

There’s controversy over how the spill occurred. The construction crew charges that the pipeline wasn’t properly marked, and the pipeline operator has blamed the crew.

The leak was stopped after 30 minutes and the larger, precautionary evacuations of homes west of Inlet Drive, along Ridge, Belcarra, and Malibu drives and North Cliff Crescent were called off.

Some witnesses said oil shot 30 metres into the air like a geyser for 25 minutes. The black liquid rained down on houses, spewed across two lanes of traffic and ran downhill into the inlet.

The residents of the 50 homes that had to be evacuated will be put up at hotels for one to two nights, Burnaby Mayor Derek Corrigan said.

Witnesses say crude oil shot 30 metres into the air like a geyser for 25 minutes.
(CBC)
“We smelled oil and the smell of gas in [our] home,” said one resident, Natalie Marson. “Next thing I know, we heard a frantic knock and it was police officers telling us to get out.”

Corrigan confirmed to CBC News that a construction crew digging with an excavator on Inlet Drive near the intersection of Barnet Highway and Hastings Street ruptured the pipeline carrying crude oil at around 12:30 p.m local time Tuesday.

The crew said the line, which is operated by Kinder Morgan Canada, was improperly marked.

It’s up to the company to mark the location of the oil pipeline before a construction crew starts working, Corrigan said. But the exact cause of the rupture still needs to be determined, he added.

Ian Anderson, president of Kinder Morgan Canada, blamed city contractors for the massive oil spill.

“We will be undertaking a thorough investigation of what occurred. We will be following up with contractors,” he said.

Oil pipeline work carefully planned: company head
Anderson said his company was in contact with the contractors to ensure they knew the location of the oil pipeline.

“When we mark these lines, we typically mark the surface where the sewer work is to be done,” he said. “We [were] in contact with contractors working in the area last week, planning out the work they’re doing.”

The Barnet Highway has been closed from Hastings to St. John Street until further notice, causing traffic delays between Vancouver and cities east of Burnaby.

The oil spread to nearby Burrard Inlet.
(CBC)
Jay Ritchlin, a marine conservation specialist with the David Suzuki Foundation, said it will take a few days to determine whether the marine environment has been harmed.

“Immediate bird kills are an obvious sign, or marine mammals that are stranded and in distress,” Ritchlin told CBC News. “You also have to be concerned about the oil residue that settles into the coastline, any of the marshes along on the way there.”

Dr. Martin Helina, of the Vancouver Aquarium, said there could be long-term toxic effects on any exposed animals.

“They [toxins] hurt the liver, might infect the lungs, might hurt red blood cells, might affect reproduction many, many years down the line,” he said.

BC Transit officials said Tuesday afternoon that at least one bus route to Coquitlam was out of service. The West Coast Express, a commuter rail service linking cities such as Mission, Maple Ridge, Pitt Meadows, Port Moody, Port Coquitlam, and Coquitlam with downtown Vancouver, was running with delays.

Cleanup continues on B.C. oil spill

Cleanup continued Tuesday on a major oil spill that has forced residents of a Burnaby, B.C., neighbourhood from at least 50 homes, and raised serious environmental concerns.

A pipeline was ruptured at Inlet Drive and Ridge Drive in Burnaby, B.C., spilling oil in the neighbourhood.
(CBC)
By late afternoon, the spill, which crept down to the waters of Burrard Inlet, was contained.

But officials were still assessing how much crude oil was spilled, after a construction crew’s backhoe inadvertently broke a pipeline that connected a refinery to a refuelling facility in the harbour.

There’s controversy over how the spill occurred. The construction crew charges that the pipeline wasn’t properly marked, and the pipeline operator has blamed the crew.

The leak was stopped after 30 minutes and the larger, precautionary evacuations of homes west of Inlet Drive, along Ridge, Belcarra, and Malibu drives and North Cliff Crescent were called off.

Some witnesses said oil shot 30 metres into the air like a geyser for 25 minutes. The black liquid rained down on houses, spewed across two lanes of traffic and ran downhill into the inlet.

The residents of the 50 homes that had to be evacuated will be put up at hotels for one to two nights, Burnaby Mayor Derek Corrigan said.

Witnesses say crude oil shot 30 metres into the air like a geyser for 25 minutes.
(CBC)
“We smelled oil and the smell of gas in [our] home,” said one resident, Natalie Marson. “Next thing I know, we heard a frantic knock and it was police officers telling us to get out.”

Corrigan confirmed to CBC News that a construction crew digging with an excavator on Inlet Drive near the intersection of Barnet Highway and Hastings Street ruptured the pipeline carrying crude oil at around 12:30 p.m local time Tuesday.

The crew said the line, which is operated by Kinder Morgan Canada, was improperly marked.

It’s up to the company to mark the location of the oil pipeline before a construction crew starts working, Corrigan said. But the exact cause of the rupture still needs to be determined, he added.

Ian Anderson, president of Kinder Morgan Canada, blamed city contractors for the massive oil spill.

“We will be undertaking a thorough investigation of what occurred. We will be following up with contractors,” he said.

Oil pipeline work carefully planned: company head
Anderson said his company was in contact with the contractors to ensure they knew the location of the oil pipeline.

“When we mark these lines, we typically mark the surface where the sewer work is to be done,” he said. “We [were] in contact with contractors working in the area last week, planning out the work they’re doing.”

The Barnet Highway has been closed from Hastings to St. John Street until further notice, causing traffic delays between Vancouver and cities east of Burnaby.

The oil spread to nearby Burrard Inlet.
(CBC)
Jay Ritchlin, a marine conservation specialist with the David Suzuki Foundation, said it will take a few days to determine whether the marine environment has been harmed.

“Immediate bird kills are an obvious sign, or marine mammals that are stranded and in distress,” Ritchlin told CBC News. “You also have to be concerned about the oil residue that settles into the coastline, any of the marshes along on the way there.”

Dr. Martin Helina, of the Vancouver Aquarium, said there could be long-term toxic effects on any exposed animals.

“They [toxins] hurt the liver, might infect the lungs, might hurt red blood cells, might affect reproduction many, many years down the line,” he said.

BC Transit officials said Tuesday afternoon that at least one bus route to Coquitlam was out of service. The West Coast Express, a commuter rail service linking cities such as Mission, Maple Ridge, Pitt Meadows, Port Moody, Port Coquitlam, and Coquitlam with downtown Vancouver, was running with delays.

3 companies plead guilty to Burnaby oil spill

The three companies responsible for a 2007 oil spill in a residential area in Burnaby, B.C., entered guilty pleas in Vancouver on Monday.

Two contractors and Trans Mountain Pipeline, the company that owns the pipeline, each entered guilty pleas under a 21-count indictment in B.C. Provincial Court.

The charges come under the Environmental Management Act and essentially add up to introducing pollution into the environment.

The Crown is looking for each of the three companies to pay a $1,000 fine and to make a $149,000 contribution to the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation, which works to protect B.C.’s fish, wildlife and habitats.

Trans Mountain Pipeline will also be asked to contribute $100,000 to an educational and training program.

The sentences are expected to be handed down later this month.

The oil spilled into Burrard Inlet, contaminating the water. Rafal Gerszak/Canadian Press
An excavator working on a sewage line pierced a pipeline in July 2007, releasing more than 250,000 litres of crude oil. About 70,000 litres flowed into Burrard Inlet, sparking a $15-million cleanup.

Crude oil also sprayed 11 houses on Inlet Drive and caused a large evacuation of the area, forcing 250 residents from their homes.

A report released by the Transportation Safety Board of Canada in 2009 concluded a lack of communication was one of the main factors that contributed to the break.

The report said a lack of respect for on-site pre-construction procedures and inadequate communication compromised the safe operation of the pipeline.

The report found the pipeline was not accurately represented on the contractor’s design drawings, which were based on a 1957 drawing.

Minister of Education: Pipelines and School Safety

BURNABY NOW
Jennifer Moreau

BROKE, a group of local residents against Kinder Morgan’s pipeline expansion, are taking their concerns about schools and pipelines to the provincial government. They wrote this letter to the Education Minister Don McRae today, calling for a B.C. wide plan to deal with any potential risks of oil pipelines close to schools.

Burnaby Residents Opposing Kinder Morgan Expansion
6508 East Hastings Street P.O. Box 44063 Kensington Square, Burnaby, B.C., V5B 1S0

HONOURABLE DON MCRAE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
PO BOX 9161 STN PROV GOVT
VICTORIA BC V8W 9H3

December 14, 2012

Honourable Don McRae:

Companies that transport oil products, or process them, have never been able to guarantee the safety of critical infrastructure, including oil pipelines, terminals, tank farms, sub-stations, refineries or tankers.[i] That is why it is vital that we have safety and health procedures to protect children and staff at schools lying near or adjacent to jet fuel and crude oil pipelines and other oil and refinery infrastructure.

There have been at least 78 leaks, spills and ruptures on the Trans Mountain pipeline alone.[ii] Three have occurred close to schools in the past five years and all required evacuations and one required hospitalizations.

In 2007, for instance, a massive spill from an oil pipeline rupture occurred in the Westridge area of Burnaby. During this incident two hundred and thirty two cubic meters of heavy crude oil was released.[iii] There was no adequate evacuation system in place.

In 2008 a gas pipe rupture occurred overlooking Seaforth Elementary School and a tank farm spill occurred in 2009 very near to Forest Grove as well as Burnaby Mountain Secondary. This sub-station spill involved an estimated 200 cubic meters of oil.

Yet another spill occurred near a Sumas sub-station in 2012. That spill occurred very close to a private school and one hundred and ten cubic meters of oil was release. Evacuations were also required.[iv]

The National Energy Board was very critical of Kinder Morgan’s handling of the Sumas spill because warnings were ignored. The Vancouver Province noted: “The [NEB] report issued earlier this month to interested parties and posted on the NEB site on Nov. 22 found “the leak was detected later than it should have been,” the company’s management of procedures was “inadequate” and that the operator “failed to recognize the leak situation” on two occasions.”[v]

The potential health risks to children in schools near or adjacent to oil pipelines is underlined by the tragedy occurring in Fallon Nevada. A lawsuit launched by a Nevada mother against Kinder Morgan alleges that the company failed to adequately monitor and repair a pipeline that was leaking jet fuel into the ground beneath a school playground over a decade ago. Evidence suggests that this leak contributed to a cluster of childhood cancer cases at the school, and to the 2008 death of 10-year-old cancer victim Ryan Brune.[vi]

However, despite the real and present risk to the health and safety of students and staff from long-term exposure or the potential for future catastrophic events, the Ministry of Education does not have specific guidelines with respect to schools lying adjacent or near oil pipelines, terminals, tank farms, sub-stations, refineries or tankers despite the fact this infrastructure often lies above schools and within seismically active zones.[vii]

Therefore, the Burnaby Residents Opposing KinderMorgan Expansion expects that the province of British Columbia, the Ministry of Education and the Board of Education in Burnaby will:

1. Prepare a safety plan for all affected schools in BC to respond oil spills and/or exposure to the cocktail of toxic chemicals used to transport oil by pipelines, sub-stations, and tankers or stored in tank farms, refineries;

2. Prepare specific evacuation training for school staff in the event of a jet fuel or crude oil spill or leak since jet fuel lines and crude oil lines pose different types of risk to health and safety, and;

3. Develop a long-term gas and oil leak monitoring plan along all oil pipelines, sub-stations, tank farms and refineries near or adjacent to schools and schoolyards throughout the province.

The issue of child and staff safety at schools near or adjacent to oil pipelines, tank farms, sub-stations and refineries is not new. The Burnaby Residents Opposing KinderMorgan Expansion drew public attention to the matter in a news release reported in the Vancouver Province and Burnaby Now on November 24, 2012.[viii]

The Burnaby Teachers Association also adopted a comprehensive resolution on child and staff safety on December 4, 2012, calling on the Provincial government, the Ministry of Education and the Burnaby Board of Education to investigate the specific health and safety risks of long term exposure to jet fuel and other oil products, including diluted bitumen and the chemicals used to transport it, at schools on or near the present oil pipelines and oil tank farms in Burnaby.[ix]

We look forward to hearing from you on this important matter that affects families and teaching staff throughout the province. Should you require additional information, or if you would like to meet in person to discuss any or all of the proposals recommended by the Burnaby Residents Opposing KinderMorgan Expansion, you may contact me at info@brokepipelinewatch.ca.

On behalf of the Burnaby Residents Opposing KinderMorgan Expansion

[i] Morgan Information Session Stoney Creek Community School Burnaby BC October, 24, 2012.

[ii] Trans Mountain Incident Report Table, National Energy Board, 2012. Column 74; July 24, 2007.

[iii] Trans Mountain Incident Report Table, National Energy Board, 2012. Column 76; May 6, 2009.

[iv] Trans Mountain Incident Report Table, National Energy Board, 2012 . Column 79; January 24, 2012.

[v]http://www.theprovince.com/news/Kinder+Morgan+ignored+warnings+Sumas+Mountain+spill/7628165/story.html#axzz2EtPpiyZw

[vi] http://www.mynews4.com/news/local/story/fallon-cancer-cluster/–P1ofP56UqVNbV3tPtJDg.cspx

[vii] E-mail to the Burnaby School District November 29, 2012

[viii]“ Parents raise concerns about pipeline beneath Burnaby schools.” http://www.theprovince.com/news/bc/Parents+raise+concerns+about+pipeline+beneath+Burnaby+schools/7606058/story.html – axzz2F6n8kRmb

[ix] Burnaby Teacher’s Association Dec 4, 2012 “Resolution #7: Pipeline Resolution.”

Burnaby residents want Education Minister to draft pipeline safety plan for B.C. schools

Author
JENNIFER MOREAU
Burnaby residents are taking their concerns about pipelines close to schools to the provincial government.

BROKE – Burnaby Residents Opposing Kinder Morgan Expansion – wants Education Minister Don McRae to come up with a detailed health and safety plan for all affected B.C. schools to respond to any oil spills “or exposure to the highly toxic chemicals used in modern oil pipelines, sub-stations, tank farms, refineries and tankers as well as specific evacuation training for school staff.”

The residents first raised concerns about the Kinder Morgan’s pipeline running beneath the school grounds at Stoney Creek Community School in late November, the same school where Kinder Morgan held its first local information session on the pipeline expansion plan.

The residents’ letter, dated Dec. 14, also asks for a “long-term gas leak monitoring along all oil pipelines, sub-stations, tank farms and refineries near or adjacent to schools and schoolyards throughout the province.”

BROKE, whose membership includes people whose homes were sprayed with oil in the 2007 pipeline rupture, pointed to another Kinder Morgan spill in 2009, when 200,000 litres of oil leaked from the Burnaby tank farm. According to BROKE’s letter to the minister, there were evacuations in the nearby community.

The letter also mentions a recent motion passed by the Burnaby Teachers’ Association, calling on the provincial government and the Education Ministry and the Burnaby education board to investigate health and safety risks of long-term exposure to jet fuel and other oil products, “including diluted bitumen and the chemicals used to transport it, at schools on or near the present oil pipelines and oil tank farms in Burnaby.”

Outgoing school board chair Larry Hayes told the NOW in late November that the district will be consulting with Kinder Morgan on how to deal with potential oil-related risks.

The Trans Mountain pipeline has been transporting oil products from Alberta to the West Coast since 1953, and Kinder Morgan, the pipeline’s operator, now wants to twin the system to increase shipping capacity from 300,000 barrels of oil per day to 750,000. The current pipeline’s right of way runs through two Burnaby school district properties: Stoney Creek Community School and Forest Grove Elementary.

Keep checking this website for updates with a response from the Education Ministry.

To read the full letter, got to Jennifer Moreau’s blog at www.burnabynow.com.

© Copyright (c) Burnaby Now

Original source article: Burnaby residents want Education Minister to draft pipeline safety plan for B.C. schools

Read more: http://www.burnabynow.com/Crunch+Christmas+Bureau/7699095/story.html#ixzz2G2kMpPqC

Police evacuate 500 residents from north Burnaby after gas leak

An underground gas leak on Lougheed Highway in north Burnaby, B.C., forced the evacuation of 500 residents from the area nearby Monday night, as crews continued to investigate the cause.

Terasen Gas crews turned off five valves Monday night in order to stop an underground gas leak on Lougheed Highway in north Burnaby.
(CBC)
The Burnaby Fire Department said a high concentration of natural gas showed up in the area, prompting the evacuation.

“There is a possibility of [explosion] but as I say, we got the area pretty well surrounded here right now, and stabilized,” George Whitehurst, the assistant fire chief, told CBC News Monday night.

The leak appears to be located under the road, he said.

Joyce Wagenaar, corporate communications manager of Terasen Gas, said the rupture involved a 15-centimetre pipeline, but the leak had been brought under control.

RCMP say the Burnaby Fire Department first received reports of people smelling gas along Lougheed Highway near Lake City Way at around 5:10 p.m. local time.
(CBC)
“We’ve isolated a piece of pipe where the gas was leaking to make sure the situation is safe,” she said Monday night.

“Now we are going to investigate the cause of the leak and our crews will be excavating … to determine what repairs need to take place.”

Burnaby RCMP said the evacuated area is extensive — from Lougheed Highway in the north to Government Road in the south and from Production Way to the east to Bainbridge Avenue to the west.

RCMP spokeswoman Cpl. Alexandra Mulvihill told CBC News the Burnaby Fire Department first received reports of people smelling gas at around 5:10 p.m.

George Whitehurst, assistant fire chief for the Burnaby Fire Department, says a high concentration of natural gas showed up in the area, prompting the evacuation Monday night.
(CBC)
Fire crews and members of Terasen Gas arrived on the scene and then called the RCMP for further assistance.

“Currently, we are still trying to determine the exact cause, the source [and] more importantly, to get the people out who … are in the hot zone,” Mulvihill said.

Crews from Terasen Gas turned off five valves Monday night in order to stop the gas from leaking, she said.

“Then, it could just be a matter of going in to determine the gas that did leak, where it’s gone [and] how far,” she said.

Arrangements were made for the residents under evacuation orders to stay at Cameron Recreation Centre Monday night, Mulvihill said.

The closure of the Lougheed Highway, between Production Way and Lake City Way, also brought a halt to SkyTrain service in the area in the evening.

Transit authority TransLink said SkyTrain service from Holdom through to the Lougheed Town Centre stations were cancelled in the evening.

Gas leak repaired near Lougheed Highway

Terasen Gas officials repaired a gas pipeline Tuesday morning after a leak forced the evacuation of a neighbourhood in Burnaby, B.C., and blocked rush-hour traffic along the Lougheed Highway Monday evening.

Crews worked overnight to repair the pipeline, and the highway was reopened for the morning rush hour.

A Terasen Gas crew turns off a valve Monday night in order to stop an undergound gas leak on Lougheed Highway in north Burnaby.

(CBC)
Highway traffic could possibly be disrupted again later in the day to continue repairs, said Terasen Gas spokeswoman Joyce Wagenaar.

The leak was first discovered around 5 p.m. Monday, when the fire department started getting calls from people complaining of a strong odour of gas around the Lougheed Highway and Underhill area.

Terasen Gas shut down a number of valves to isolate the leaking pipeline and police went door to door, telling 500 people to leave their homes.

Crews eventually determined the leak was coming from a crack in a pipeline and residents were allowed to return to their homes around 8 p.m. after the gas was shut off.

Crude oil leak at Burnaby Mountain tank contained: Kinder Morgan

Some Burnaby residents awoke to the strong smell of oil fumes after about 200,000 litres of crude oil spilled from a storage tank on Burnaby Mountain on Wednesday night.

The leak at the Kinder Morgan tank farm just east of Vancouver was spotted at about 10 p.m. by a contractor, the company said. The oil was captured in a lined containment bay surrounding the tank, and there were no leaks into the surrounding environment, the company said.

Hazardous-materials crews and firefighters sprayed the leaked oil with foam to keep down the smell on Thursday morning, while the company determined what to do with the leaked oil. The company was also monitoring the air quality at the site, but said the odorous fumes were not a safety issue.

Kinder Morgan also involved in spill in 2007

There are 13 tanks at the storage facility located near the intersection of Gaglardi Way and Burnaby Mountain Parkway, and this is not the first time that Kinder Morgan has had to deal with leaking oil linked to the Burnaby facility.

In July 2007, a construction crew digging with an excavator on Inlet Drive near the intersection of Barnet Highway and Hastings Street ruptured a Kinder Morgan pipeline carrying crude from the tank farm to a tanker facility on Burrard Inlet on the north side of Burnaby Mountain.

About 234,000 litres of oil shot 30 metres into the air for about 25 minutes, covering some nearby homes, and oozing into Burrard Inlet. The Transportation Safety Board eventually concluded the line was improperly marked on outdated drawings used by the contractor and blamed the spill on inadequate communication between Kinder Morgan and the contractor.